THE DAM EASY FLOOD BARRIER

by Dave Collins on November 4, 2017



THE DAM EASY FLOOD BARRIER

Compiled 4th Nov 2017

clip_image002The flood season is fast approaching and timely to talk about a couple of South East Queensland locals trading as Oceanic Growth Partners and taking up a product that looks globally relevant in flood mitigation. Oceania Growth Partners saw the product at an Agricultural Festival in Ireland on the tail end of a recent collaborative Australian and NZ Innovation Trade Mission to Ireland.

The guys from Oceania Growth Partners are now the Australian and New Zealand distributer for an innovative Irish company who have developed a unique flood protection barrier. The Dam East Flood Barrier (see https://www.dameasyfloodbarriers.com/ ) replaces sand bags and other inefficient barriers with a simple to install, pressurised door and garage seal that prevents a house or commercial premises being flooded. This new flood protection barrier solves a number of long-term problems but first a little on the background and product.

The product is patent protected and was a finalist in the resilience awards at the 2017 World Flood Expo. The product is high quality, durable, installable in a minute, and can prevent those floods which would otherwise cause a household or business premises to be inundated resulting in distress, business stoppage or the inability to be able to carry out normal household operation or administrative services (think councils, government departments) during or immediately post a flood event.



In terms of the problem being solved one needs to only consider the 1.3 Million homes that have a flood risk rating in Australia and reflect on the Brisbane floods, inundations around Ipswich and the Lockyer Valley, Bundaberg’s flood trauma, annual flooding in the Queensland tropics or the devastating effects of floods in Lismore over the last 12 months. The Dam Easy Flood Barrier solves the problem of 70% of homes or premises being flooded by 300mm of water resulting in, on average, $25,000 worth of damage or insurance claim per household. It is quick to install, and negates the need for resources, storage and transport and clean up / filling of sand bags. It can be easily installed and is also a more water-tight result than traditional methods.

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I am led to believe that fulfilling an order is a quick and direct process and one could also consider that the product itself has sufficient space on the front and back panels for branding and promotional purposes.

The costs and benefits speak for themselves when compared to the accumulated costs of alternatives and flood clean-up. Individual units retail for around $849 with an ability to extend width with a ‘joiner’ and there’s also discounts for larger volumes. This cost would be highly effective on a cost benefit analysis when compared to

– traditional methods and human resources required for one-off sand-bagging,

– asset loss and damage as a result of flooding,

– administrative or business stoppage due to flooding,

– the Dam Easy Flood Barrier is re-useable so cost per use decreases over time

– residential and business clean up costs, and

– increased insurance premiums that would otherwise result from high claim rates if not using a resilient flood protection barrier.

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Past and Present Classifications of the Australian Slip Testing Standards

AS/NZS 4663:2004. Slip resistance measurements of existing pedestrian surfaces.

Appendix A. Wet Pendulum Test Method (In-situ and Lab Testing)

Appendix B. Dry Floor Friction Test Method (In-situ and Lab Testing)

AS/NZS 4586:2004. Slip resistance classifications of new pedestrian surface materials.

Appendix A. Wet Pendulum Test Method (Lab Testing)

Appendix B. Dry Floor Friction Test Method (Lab Testing)

Appendix C. Wet/Barefoot Ramp Test Method (Lab Testing)

Appendix D. Oil-Wet Ramp Test Method (Lab Testing)

Appendix E. Displacement Volume Test Method (Lab Testing)

Handbook HB 197:1999. An introductory guide to the slip resistance of pedestrian surface materials

Chapter 3 Use of AS/NZS 4586 Classifications in Selecting Pedestrian surface Materials.

Chapter 4 Which Wet Slip Test should I use as the bases for my Specification?

Chapter 5 General Commentary

Ramp Classifications

Pendulum Classifications

Chapter 6 Requirements for Ramps and other Sloped Surfaces

Chapter 7 Selection of Pedestrian Surface Materials According to the Ramp Tests

Wet Barefoot Slip Resistance

Slip Resistance in Commercial and Industrial Areas

The meanings of terminologies used for reporting slip resistance values.

Appendix (A) Wet Pendulum Test Method (MBPN) Mean British Pendulum Number.

V Class Classification = >54BP

W Class Classification = 45-54BPN

X Class Classification = 35-44BPN

Y Class Classification = 25-34BPN

Z Class Classification = <25BPN

Appendix (B) Dry Floor Friction Test Method (Coefficient of Friction)

F = ≥40CoF

G = ≤40CoF

Appendix (C) Wet/Barefoot Ramp Test Method (Laboratory testing only)

A ≥12 <18

B ≥18 <24

C ≥24

Appendix (D) Oil-Wet Ramp Test Method (Laboratory testing only)

R9 = ≥6 <10

R10= ≥10 <19

R11 = ≥19 <27

R12 = ≥27 <35

R13 = ≥35

Please keep in mind that Australian Standards AS/NZS 4586:2004 was designed for laboratory testing in controlled conditions and Australian Standards AS/NZS 4663:2004 for In-situ Testing.

Reference HB197:1999 Table 3 Pedestrian Flooring Selection Guide-Minimum Pendulum or Ramp recommendations for specific Locations

Specific Locations

Pendulum

Ramp

MBPN

Assessable internal stair nosing’s (Dry) – Handrail present

X

R10

35-44

Assessable internal stair nosing’s (Wet) – Handrail present

      W

B/ R11

45-54

External colonnade, walkways and pedestrian crossings 

      W

R10

45-54

External Ramps

V

R11

  >54

Entry foyers hotel, office and public Buildings – Wet

X

R10

35-44

Entry foyers hotel, office and public Buildings – Dry

Z

R9

  <25

Lift lobbies above external entry level

Z

R9

  <25

Internal ramps, slopes(greater than 2 degrees) – Dry

X

R10

35-44

Shopping Centre excluding food court

Z

R9

  <25

Shopping Centre – Food Court

X

R10

35-44

Other separate shops inside shopping centre

Z

R9

  <25

Other shops with external entrances – entry area

X

R10

35-44

Fast food outlets, buffet food servery area

X

R10

35-44

Hospitals and aged care facilities – dry area

Z

R9

  <25

Hospitals and aged care facilities – en/suites

X

A/R10

35-44

Supermarket aisles except fresh food area

Z

R9

  <25

Shop and supermarket fresh fruit and vegetable areas

X

R10

35-44

Toilet facilities in offices, hotels and shopping centres

X

R10

35-44

Undercover concourse areas of sports stadiums

X

R10

35-44

External stair nosing

      W

R11

45-54

Communal changing rooms

X

A

35-39

Swimming pool ramps and stairs leading into water

V

C

  >44

Swimming pool surrounds and communal shower rooms

W

B

40-44

Note

1. Appropriate measures need to be taken to exclude casual water from dry areas. (15min wand System)

2. All floors with a wet pendulum classification of Z should have a dry friction classification of F (≥ 0.40 CoF) unless normal usage dictates that the floor should have a low dry coefficient of Friction, e.g. dance floors.

3. Table 5 contains higher requirements for some specific types of shops.

4. Refer to Tables 2, 4 and 5 in AS/NZS 4586for derivation of Classifications

TABLE 2 Interpretationsof Dry Floor Friction Result

        Floor Friction Tester Mean Value

Notional* contribution of the floor surface to the risk of slipping when Dry

F            ≥0.40

                 Moderate to very low

G            <0.40

                    High to very high

The term notional has been used to highlight the need to consider all potential contributing factors to a slip incident.

Note: for a ‘Moderate to very low ‘interpretation, each individual test result shall be equal to or greater than 0.35.

Reference: Australian Standards AS/NZS 4663:2004.

CHANGES

Some of the noticeable changes to the Australian Slip Testing Standards are below; I have included a possible scenario to the changes to Table 3Pedestrian Flooring Selection Guide-Minimum Pendulum or Ramp Recommendations for Specific Locations in the classifications.

AREA CLASSIFICATIONS

· Dry areas  those areas in which appropriate control measures ensure an area remains dry when in use.

· Transitional areas  those areas that are intended to be kept dry, such as by the provision of design features (awnings, drains, mats, air locks etc.) appropriate to the physical locations, climate and general exposure to water as maintained in a dry and clean conditions by the facility manager.

· Wet areas  those areas that are not defined as a dry or transitional areas, which may be either constantly or intermittently wet or otherwise contaminated.

AS 4663-2013 Slip Resistance Measurements of Existing Pedestrian surfaces.

Appendix A. Wet Pendulum Test Method. (In-situ and Lab Testing)

Appendix B. Dry Floor Friction Test Method. (In-situ and Lab Testing)

Appendix C. Examples of Determining Slope Design Value (SDV) and Slope Correction Value (SCV)

BIBLIOGRAPHY SA

AS 4586-2013 Slip resistance classifications of new pedestrian surface materials

Appendix A. WET PENDULUM TEST METHOD

Appendix B. DRY FLOOR FRICTION TEST METHOD

Appendix C. WET – BAREFOOT INCLINING PLATFORM TEST METHOD

Appendix D. OIL – WET INCLINING PLATFORM TEST METHOD

Appendix E. DISPLACEMENT VOLUME TEST METHOD

Appendix F. EXAMPLE OF DETERMINING SLOPE DESIGN VALUE (SDV) AND SLOPE CORRECTION VALUE (SCV)

Slip Resistance Value (SRV)

The SRV is the mean BPN value for the sample that has been tested, regardless of whether the surface was level or on a slope.

Slope Correction Value (SCV)

When the slip resistance of a sloping surface of known maximum gradient is measured, the SCV is an adjusted SRV, giving a value equivalent to that of the equivalent SRV for a level surface.

Slope Design Value (SDV)

The SDV is the mean BPN value required of a known maximum gradient. The SDV may be calculated by using the tables that are given in Appendix D, using the minimum SRV that is considered appropriate for a level surface.

TESTING RUBBER: NEW CLASSIFICATIONS FOR PENDULUM TESTING

The Standards Four S rubber is now also known as Slider 96. It was developed as a rubber of average slip resistance characteristics. When assessing products for wet barefoot areas, or unusually rough products, the use of the softer more malleable TRL may be advantageous. The TRL rubber is now also known as Slider 55.

HB198:2014 Table 3B Recommended Minimum Pendulum or Ramp Classifications.

For Application where the National Construction Code Dose Not Require Slip Resistance

Specific Locations

Pendulum

Ramp

MBPN

External pavement & Ramps

External ramps including sloping driveways, footpaths etc. Steeper than 1 in 14

External ramps including sloping driveways, footpaths etc. under 1 in 14

External sales areas (e.g. Markets), external car parks, external colonnade walkways, pedestrian crossings, balconies, verandas, carports, driveways, courtyards and roof tops.

Undercover Car

P5

P4

P3

R12

R11

R10

>54

45-54

35-44

Hotels, offices, public buildings, schools& kindergartens

Entries and access areas including hotels, offices, public buildings, shopping centres, shops, school, kindergartens, common areas of public buildings, internal lift lobbies.

Wet Areas

Transitional Areas

Dry Areas

Toilet facilities in office, hotels and shopping centres.

Hotel bathrooms, ensuites and toilets.

Hotel toilets and laundries

P3

P2

P1

P3

P2

P2

R10

R9

R9

R10

A

R9

35-44

25-34

12-24

35-44

20-34

25-34

Supermarkets and Shopping Centres

Fast food outlets, buffet food servery areas, food courts and fast food dining areas in shopping centres.

Shops and supermarkets fruit and vegetable areas.

Fast food outlets and buffet food servery areas.

Shop entry areas with external entrances.

Supermarket aisles (fast food areas).

Other separate shops inside shopping centres – Wet.

Other separate shops inside shopping centres – Dry. (See note 3)

P3

P3

P3

P3

P1

P3

P1

R10

R10

R10

R10

R9

R10

R9

35-44

35-44

35-44

35-44

12-24

35-44

12-24

Loading Docks, Commercial Kitchens, Cold Stores, Serving Areas

Loading docks under cover and Commercial kitchens.

Serving areas behind bars in public hotels and clubs, cold stores and freezers.

P5

P4

R12

R11

>54

45-54 

Swimming Pools and Sporting Facilities

Swimming pool ramps and stairs leading to water.

Swimming pool surrounds and communal shower rooms.

Communal changing rooms.

Undercover concourse of sporting stadiums

P5

P4

P3

P3

C

B

A

R10

>44

40-44

35-39

35-44

Hospitals and age care facilities

Bathrooms and en-suites in hospitals and age care facilities.

Wards and corridors in hospitals and age car facilities.

P3

P2

B

R9

35-39

25-34

Note

Recommendations highlighted in red are to be tested according to Appendix (A) Wet Pendulum Test Method using Rubber Slider 55.

Table 1

Classification of Pedestrian Surface Materials According to AS 4586 – 2013 wet pendulum Test method

Pendulum SRV

Classification

Rubber³ Slider 96

Rubber³ Slider 55

Relative² contribution of the floor surface to the risk of slipping when water – Wet

P5

>54

>44

Very Low

P4

45-54

40-44

Low

P3

35-44

35-39

Moderate

P2

25-34

20-34

High

P1

12-24

<20

Very High

P0

<12

Extremely High

1. The slip test is known as the Wet pendulum Test Method, reflecting the fact that it is commonly applied to hard and resilient floor surfaces to which water is applied. One exception is for internal carpets which are tested dry.

2. The term Relative has been used to highlight the need to consider all potential factors contributing to a slip incident.

3. While either Slider 96 or Slider 55 rubber may be used depending on the material and its intended application, the test report shall specify which rubber was used.

Table 2

Classification of Pedestrian Surface Materials According to AS 4586 – 2013 Dry Floor Friction Method

Classification

Floor Friction Test Mean Value

Relativeⁱ contribution of the floor surface to the risk of slipping when water Dry

D1

≥0.40

Moderate to Very Low

D0

≤0.40

High to Very High

Note 1. The term “relative” has been used to highlight the need to consider all potential factors contributing to a slip incident.

Note 2 For Moderate to Very Low interpretation, each individual slip test result shall be equal to or greater than 0.35.

Table 3A

Specified Minimum Pendulum or Ramp Classifications

Deemed – to – Satisfy the Requirements in the National Construction Code

Location

Wet Pendulum Test Method

Oil-Wet Inclining Platform Test

Stair Treads and Stairway Landings

Building covered by the National Construction (Code 2014 – BCA Volume 1 and 2)

Stair Treads and a stairway landing (DRY)

Stair Treads and a stairway landing (WET)

P3

P4

R10

R11

Nosings for Stair Treads and Stairway Landings

Building covered by the National Construction (Code 2014 – BCA Volume 1 and 2)

Dry stair treads, a non-skid strip and a stairway landing.

Wet stair treads, a non-skid strip and a stairway landing.

P3

P4

R10

R11

Ramps

Building covered by the National Construction Code 2014 – BCA Volume 1

Ramps not steeper than 1 : 14 Gradient (when DRY)

Ramps not steeper than 1 : 14 Gradient (when WET)

Ramps steeper than 1 : 14 but not steeper than I : 8 (when DRY)

Ramps steeper than 1 : 14 but not steeper than I : 8 (when WET)

P3

P4

P4

P5

R10

R11

R11

R11

Slip Resistance Value (SRV)

The SRV is the mean BPN value for the sample that has been tested, regardless of whether the surface was level or on a slope.

Slope Correction Value (SCV)

When the slip resistance of a sloping surface of known maximum gradient is measured, the SCV is an adjusted SRV, giving a value equivalent to that of the equivalent SRV for a level surface.

Slope Design Value (SDV)

The SDV is the mean BPN value required of a known maximum gradient. The SDV may be calculated by using the tables that are given in Appendix D, using the minimum SRV that is considered appropriate for a level surface.

APPENDIX A

WET PENDULUM TEST METHOD

A1 SCOPE

This Appendix sets out the method for the measurement of the frictional characteristics of new pedestrian materials under wet conditions using a pendulum friction tester.

A2 CARPET

When this pendulum test method is used for the measurement of the frictional characteristics of new carpet or carpet like surface materials, the presents of any underlay and the condition of the surface shall be reported.

A3 AGEING or WEAR

If a product Standard or specification contains a requirement for the permanence of slip resistance, this requirement shall be determined after the appropriate accelerated ageing or wear testing procedure.

APPENDIX C

WET BAREFOOT INCLINING PLATEFORM TEST METHOD

C1 SCOPE

This Appendix sets out a method for the measurement of the friction characteristics of pedestrian surface materials using the wet-barefoot inclining platform method. Classification Values A, B or C, refer to Table 4 Classification of Pedestrian Surface Materials According to the Wet-Barefoot Inclining Platform Test.

APPENDIX D

OIL –WET INCLINING PLATEFORM TEST METHOD

D1 SCOPE

This Appendix sets out the method for the measurement of the friction characteristics of pedestrian surface materials using the oil-wet inclining platform method. Classification Values R9 to R13, refer to Table 5 Classification of Pedestrian Surface Materials According to the Oil-Wet Inclining Platform Test.

Reference to Australian Standards

AS/NZS 4586:2004

AS/NZS 4663:2004

Handbook HB 197:1999

AS 4586-2013

AS 4663-2013

Handbook HB 198:2014

Kind regards,

SlipSmart Pty Ltd

Peter Vournechis

Floor Safety Consultant

Mob: 0410 657 399

email: peter@slipsmart.com.au

Web: www.slipsmart.com

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Safeguarding Electrical Industry Workers

by Dave Collins on October 16, 2017

Safeguarding Electrical Industry Workers

Electrical Industry Guide to Workplace Safety 2017/18 – Released

electrical guideIt is vital to follow correct health and safety precautions to ensure every electrician returns home the same way they left, without injury. Pro-Visual Publishing, in conjunction with the National Electrical and Communications Association, has released the latest edition of the Electrical Industry Guide to Workplace Safety, which provides essential health and safety information aimed at safeguarding workers within the electrical industry.

The 2017/18 edition of the Guide covers a range of key topics, including:

· Electrical testing and safety observers.

· MATES in Construction (MIC).

· Policies and procedures explained.

· Hazardous chemicals.

The Guide also offers interactive resources that are accessible via the free Pro-Vis AR app, which are highly useful in engaging staff during training sessions. The Guide is an essential resource to help keep health and safety top of mind on a daily basis.

“I would like to thank all the sponsors of the Electrical Industry Guide to Workplace Safety 2017/18. Their support has made it possible for the Guide to be distributed free of charge.”

– John Hutchings, CEO, Pro-Visual Publishing.

Pro-Visual Publishing is a group of dedicated professionals providing wall-mounted health, wellbeing and safety guides to over 40 different industries. For more than 20 years, we have been the leading specialists in this market. We aim to continually engage and educate via up-to-date information and interactive resources, with the overall motivation being to ensure greater heath and safety outcomes.

For further information, or to obtain additional copies of the Guide, please call (02) 8272 2611,

email marketing@provisual.com.au or visit www.provisual.com.au

For media enquiries or images please contact Deanna Davenport at Pro-Visual Publishing on (02) 8272 2611 or ddavenport@provisual.com.au

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